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Pitch is used as a firm, grasping, yet flexible material to hold and support an object of metal sheet.  It's qualities are such that it can hold an object in place and provide a strong surface behind the sheet.  This surface gives under pressure, but not too much, too quickly.   It is used as a backing for the techniques of Chasing and Repoussé.

Here is a recipe from Theophilus, in his work, On Divers Arts, circa 1120 AD:

Chapter 59. The Composition Called Chaser's Pitch

Grind a piece of brick or tile very small and melt some pitch in an earthenware dish and add a little wax. When these are both melted, mix in the powdered tile and stir it vigorously and pour it out into water. When it begins to grow cold, dip both your hands into the water and knead it for a long time until you can stretch the composition and draw it out like a skin. Immediately melt this composition and fill the cruet to the top.

(A cruet is a container to be decorated, which was described in the chapter 58.)  Hawthorne and Smith translation, Dover Press, 1979, pp 129-130. See Annotated Bibliography for more info.

There are two basic problems with this recipe. First of all, the proportions of the ingredients are not given, so it will take experimentation to find a suitable mixture. Second, this is a recipe for making Chaser's Pitch out of Pitch. It does not tell us how to make pitch in the first place.

Artisans use different pitch recipes depending upon how hard or soft they want the pitch to be, which is a function of the type and thickness of the metal to be moved, and the depth or precision of the markings they want to make in it. So, experimenting to find a good match for your own working style is perfectly natural and shouldn't really be considered a problem. There is no "one true answer" to this.

I checked Cennini's Il Libro dell' Arte (The Craftsman's Handbook) and Biringuccio's Pirotechnia and found no recipes for pitch. From contest, both considered the material to be readily available for purchase.

I ran across a website whose scientific, scholarly basis is so shaky that I won't do you the dis-service of sending you to it. However, they did have a good description of the process of collecting pine resin-based pitch. (The description was doubtlessly pinched from someone they failed to cite.)

So how did they make pitch before the growth of the petroleum and coal industries? Their first step was to obtain resin from the pine trees which at that time grew in dense forests throughout Europe. A herringbone pattern of cuts was gouged into the tree trunk and as the resin ran down the grooves it was collected in a pot at the base of the tree. Pine resin is still collected in this way in Poland, the Ukraine, Russia, Finland and other European countries where pine forests are still to be found.
When the resin had finished flowing, the trees were chopped down, covered in soil or ash, and burned slowly to produce a lightweight black pure form of carbon called charcoal. The last step in the process of making pitch was to add the powdered charcoal to the boiling pine resins. Different proportions of charcoal would produce pitch of different properties.

I have a friend with a lot of pine trees on his wooded property. I'll be asking him to test out the above method and report back on the results.

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Diagram of Metal Skill Hierarchy
Link to Metallurgy Skill page.Link to Anneal Skill page.Link to Alloy Skill page.Link to the Cast Skill page.Link to Pour Ingot Skill page.Link to Sand Cast Skill page.Link to the Stone Cast Skill page.Link to Lost Wax Cast Skill page.Link to Cuttlefish Cast Skill page.Link to Cuttlefish Cast Skill page.
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This is a very good article on setting up a pitch bowl using modern, store-bought materials.
nnotated Bibliography

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Hawthorne, John, Smith, Cyril Stanley, On Divers Arts, 1979
90
1120
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Describes the recipe and process for making pitch used for the Chasing and Repoussé techniques. If you are interested in period medieval metal working, glass or painting processes, this is a must-have work. Theophilus covers a wide variety of techniques and processes, including recipes for various materials.