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Enameling is the art of fusing glass on metal. The glass is typically ground up into fine granules before application onto the metal (though glass 'threads' can also be used). A thin layer of glass powder is applied to the metal, fired until the glass melts, then additional layers of enamel are applied and fired. Naturally, the full process is much more involved.  Much of the additional complexity deals with:
  • Cleaning the metal and enamel before and after firing,
  • Holding the unfired enamel in place on non-horizontal surfaces until it is fired,
  • Dealing with different coefficients of expansion, melting points, or chemical incompatibilities.
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This is a very nice group that specializes in the art of Enamelling. They have an excellent free lending library for members and sponsor a conference every two years.
 
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Grains of Glass is a website devoted to the Enameling arts. Grains of Glass members are enameling artists. Each artist can display items they have made or blog about enameling. The site provides the ability to ask/answer questions about the art.
 
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Yes
Provides copper sheet and foil in a variety of thicknesses, sizes and alloys. Has very good explanations of which products are good for what purposes and also has an inexpensive sampler pack.
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Hawthorne, John, Smith, Cyril Stanley, On Divers Arts, 1979
90
1120
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Describes the technique of making enameled powders, applying the powder, fusing the powder to the metal, and polishing the enameled surface. If you are interested in period medieval metal working, glass or painting processes, this is a must-have work. Theophilus covers a wide variety of techniques and processes, including recipes for various materials.